The Right Response to Wrong Doctrine

17 But you must remember, beloved, the predictions of the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ. 18 They said to you, “In the last time there will be scoffers, following their own ungodly passions.” 19 It is these who cause divisions, worldly people, devoid of the Spirit. 20 But you, beloved, building yourselves up in your most holy faith and praying in the Holy Spirit, 21 keep yourselves in the love of God, waiting for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ that leads to eternal life. 22 And have mercy on those who doubt; 23 save others by snatching them out of the fire; to others show mercy with fear, hating even the garment stained by the flesh. – Jude 1:17-23 ESV

Throughout his letter, Jude has said some extremely harsh things regarding the false teachers who had infiltrated the local congregation to whom he was writing. HIs purpose has been to expose these people for what they were: A real danger to the faith community. But it is interesing to note that, in no part of his letter, does Jude demand that these people be removed from the flock. He doesn’t call for their banishment. In fact, he doesn’t even call them by name.

While there is little doubt that he saw these people as a serious threat to the church’s spiritual health, he does not suggest their removal as the cure. Jude seems to understand that false teachers and false teaching will always be a part of the church’s future. The truth of God’s Word will always be challenged by the lies of the enemy. Just as Satan infiltrated the perfection of the garden and sowed doubt into the hearts of the first man and woman, by subtly twisting the words of God, he continues to spread his lies wherever the faith community gathers, and the gospel is preached.

James, the half-brother of Jesus, wrote the following words of counsel in his letter:

So humble yourselves before God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you. Come close to God, and God will come close to you. – James 4:7-8 NLT

James uses the Greek word, anthistēmi, which carries the idea of standing opposed to something, to withstand its onslaught. James is suggesting that the best strategy against the enemy is a good defense. And the apostle Paul gives similar counsel in his letter to the believers in Ephesus.

Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. – Ephesians 6:10-11 ESV

And Paul lets us know that the real threat to the body of Christ is much more powerful and sinister than false teachers communicating erroneous doctrine. It is Satan himself.

For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. – Ephesians 6:12 ESV

Which is why Paul tells us to “take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand firm” (Ephesians 6:13 ESV). And that is exactly what Jude is telling his readers to do. He reminds them to turn their attention to what the apostles of Jesus had taught. And Jude seems to be picking up the words of Peter, written in his second letter.

This is my second letter to you, dear friends, and in both of them I have tried to stimulate your wholesome thinking and refresh your memory. I want you to remember what the holy prophets said long ago and what our Lord and Savior commanded through your apostles. – 2 Peter 3:2 NLT

Peter was an apostle, and he was calling believers to listen to what he and the rest of the apostles had been teaching them. In a sense, Peter was placing their words on an equal plane as those of the Old Testament prophets, because they had received their teaching directly from Jesus Christ Himself. And Peter went on to tell them:

Most importantly, I want to remind you that in the last days scoffers will come, mocking the truth and following their own desires. – 2 Peter 3:3 NLT

These are the very words Jude quotes, and he uses them to let his readers know that the false teachers were guilty of mocking the truth and of following their own self-centered passions. And Jude refers to the words of Peter as if his audience was already familiar with them. He writes, “They said to you,” indicating that Peter’s letter had been intended for all believers, not just a single congregation. And it is likely that his letter had made it to their local community where it had been read at one of their gatherings.

So, Jude is simply reminding them of what Peter had told them would happen. The scoffers had shown up just as he had said they would. And they were mocking the truth of God. Jude accuses them of being divisive, worldly and devoid of the Spirit. It is impossible to know if Jude is suggesting that these people were without the indwelling presence of the Spirit and, therefore, unsaved. Or whether he is suggesting that they were believers who were guilty of quenching the Spirit and living according to their own sinful flesh. But either way, they were damaging the spiritual integrity of the body of Christ by their actions.

So, what were the people to do? How were they to respond to this cancer in their midst?  Jude uses two Greek words to convey their next steps: epoikodomeō and proseuchomai. The first one is translated, “building yourselves up,” but it can mean “to build upon” or “augment.” Rather than allow the teaching of the people to rock their spiritual world, they were to increase their faith in the truth of the gospel. And the primary message of the gospel is our future glorification and eternal life. Jude tells them to build up their faith while “waiting for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ that leads to eternal life” (Jude 1:21 ESV). The lies of the enemy will always attack the truth of God’s promises. Satan asked Eve, “Did God actually say…” (Genesis 3:1 ESV). Then he followed that question regarding the integrity of God’s word with a direct rebuttal of God’s command: “You will not surely die…” (Genesis 3:4 ESV).

Believers must constantly build up their faith in the Word of God, reminding one another that what He has said is true and what He has promised will happen. And the best way to augment or bolster our faith is to pray in the power of the Holy Spirit. Paul would have us remember that “the Holy Spirit helps us in our weakness. For example, we don’t know what God wants us to pray for. But the Holy Spirit prays for us with groanings that cannot be expressed in words” (Romans 8:26 NLT). When Jude refers to praying in the Holy Spirit, he is conveying the idea of dependence and reliance upon the Spirit. It is a form of submission to the Spirit, which is why Paul encourages us to “let the Holy Spirit guide your lives. Then you won’t be doing what your sinful nature craves” (Galatians 5:16 NLT).

Jude adds an interesting and somewhat confusing bit of counsel. He writes, “keep yourselves in the love of God” (Jude 1:21 ESV). At first glance, it might appear that he is suggesting that we have to earn God’s love through self-effort. But that advice would be in direct contradiction to Scripture. Paul told the believers in Rome, “But God showed his great love for us by sending Christ to die for us while we were still sinners” (Romans 5:8 NLT). So, when Jude tells them to keep themselves in God’s love, it is a reminder to focus their attention of the highest expression of that love: The gracious gift of His Son as payment for their sins and a guarantee of their eternal life.  And Paul went on to expand on the unwavering nature of God’s love.

…nothing can ever separate us from God’s love. Neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither our fears for today nor our worries about tomorrow—not even the powers of hell can separate us from God’s love. No power in the sky above or in the earth below—indeed, nothing in all creation will ever be able to separate us from the love of God that is revealed in Christ Jesus our Lord. – Romans 8:38-39 NLT

Finally, after reminding his audience to remain fully confident in the love of God, building one another up in their belief in the gospel message, and relying upon the assistance of the indwelling Spirit, Jude turns their attention to the weak among them. He demands that they show mercy on anyone struggling with doubt. Don’t attack or ostracize them. Come alongside them and build them up in their faith. And for those who seem ready to be consumed by the fire of falsehood, Jude encourages rescue. Don’t give up on them. But he also warns that all of this must be done with extreme caution and an awareness of the danger.

“…do so with great caution, hating the sins that contaminate their lives.” – Jude 1:23 NLT

This is the spiritual battle that Paul referred to so frequently. We are in a war, and it is not against flesh and blood. It is an epic and unseen conflict that has been going on since the fall, and that involves spiritual forces far beyond our comprehension, and well beyond our capacity to withstand. False teaching is not to be treated lightly. It is dangerous and deadly and a sign of the enemy’s presence in our midst. But the best way to fight lies is with the truth. The most effective weapon against doubt is faith. And the greatest power we have in our battle with the enemy is the gospel itself.

English Standard Version (ESV) The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Permanent Text Edition® (2016). Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.s

New Living Translation (NLT) Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996, 2004, 2015 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

The Message (MSG) Copyright © 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002 by Eugene H. Peterson

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